Connecticut Quit Claim Deed Form

Connecticut Quit Claim Deed lawfully establishes the decision of one party, called the Grantor, to no longer hold a claim to a property so that it can be passed on to another party, called the Grantee. As Connecticut’s state law outlines (§ 47-36f), when this type of Deed is lawfully executed it, “has the force and effect of a conveyance to the releasee of all the releasor’s right, title and interest in and to the property described therein except as otherwise limited therein, but without any covenants of title.” In other words, the form only permits for interest in a property, rather than the title of a property, to be transferred.

Laws (§ 47-36f, § 47-36g, § 47-5): Connecticut General Statutes, Title 47: “Land and Land Titles,” Chapter 821:  “Land Titles”


Formatting rules (§ 7-24(f)): State law dictates that for the Deed to be duly recorded, it must have a blank margin that surrounds each page that is not less than three-fourths of an inch (3/4″) in width.  A return address and addressee must be present at the top of the front side of the first page of the form.


Signing requirements (§ 47-5): A Quit Claim Deed in Connecticut must be signed by the Grantor or their Agent. Notarization, as well as the presence of two (2) witnesses, are required at the time of signing.


How to file a Quit Claim Deed in Connecticut (§ 47-10): It is a state requirement for any Connecticut Quit Claim Deed to filed with the city or town clerk in the city or town where the property is located. The form must adhere to formatting rules, as stated above. Any fees associated with the filing must also be paid.

The form should be promptly filed; otherwise, due to Connecticut’s “notice recording statute” (§ 47-10(a)), the Grantee runs the risk of the another party filing their conveyance first and this party subsequently being granted the right of title. The reason this could eventuate is because the notice recording statute protects an innocent party who was not able to obtain notice about a prior conveyance (because it was not recorded at the city or town clerk).