Month-to-Month Lease Agreement Templates

A month-to-month lease agreement is a contract used to establish the expectations and rules that both a tenant and landlord are bound to abide by for as long as the lease remains in effect. The document, which is structured similarly to a standard lease, has one differentiating feature – there is no lease end-date. Either the landlord or tenant can terminate the lease with a notice of a week to more than thirty (30) days in advance – the exact notice being dependent on the state in which the rental is located.

Month-to-Month Lease Templates by State

What is a Month-to-Month Lease?

A month-to-month lease agreement is a short-term contract highlighted by the fact that it doesn’t have a specified end-date – theoretically allowing the contract to go on indefinitely until either party terminates it giving the required notice. Despite their brief nature, month-to-month rental contracts contain many of the same clauses found in standard leases, including rules on maintenance, utilities, guests, pets, and rent, to name a few. The agreement’s short-term nature serves as an attractive means of renting for those wary of entering a long-term lease and provides property managers with a means of charging a higher monthly rent due to the liability of the tenant vacating the property in a moment’s notice.

Pros & Cons of Renting by the Month

Landlords considering setting up one (1) or more of their rentals as monthly units may find themselves struggling with whether the decision is worth the risk in comparison to sticking with a traditional lease. To assist with the decision-making process, the pros and cons of utilizing a month-to-month lease (in the landlord’s perspective) are summarized below:

Pros

    • Can charge more for rent – Landlords can charge their tenants higher monthly rent due to the flexibility offered to tenants and the difficulty of finding a new tenant in such little time.
    • Rent can be raised on a moment’s notice – At the start of every new rental period (typically the first of the month), the landlord can alter the rental contract. This includes raising the rent or amending another aspect of the lease.
    • Easier to remove difficult tenants – The risk of signing a lease with a bad tenant is always a risk property managers face, regardless of the attempts to mitigate it with rental applications and other screening tools. With a monthly lease, landlords can remove tenants for essentially any reason with a notice of only one (1) month.

Cons

    • Harder to find quality tenants – The short term nature of the agreement tends to attract tenants that often stay for short increments – typically one (1) to two (2) months. Quality tenants that stay for longer terms are often dissuaded from monthly-based leases due to the prospect of the landlord abruptly terminating the contract.
    • Uncertain end date – Due to the possibility of a tenant exiting the lease with minimal notice, landlords have to stay ready to fill any vacancies on short notice. This makes it difficult for landlords to leave the state for extended periods of time or focus on other interests a landlord may have.
    • Off-season vacancy – Year-long leases offer landlords the security that the tenant will be paying rent during less-desirable months, such as winter months for states that experience colder temperatures.

Required Notice & Maximum Security Deposit

STATEREQUIRED NOTICEMAXIMUM SECURITY DEPOSIT
AlabamaLandlord - 30 days
Tenant - 30 days
One (1) month's rent.
Exceptions: Pet deposits, reversing alterations, and special circumstances
AlaskaLandlord - 30 days
Tenant - 30 days
Two (2) month's rent.
Exceptions: Rent exceeds $2k per month. Additional month's rent can be requested for pets
ArizonaLandlord - 30 days
Tenant - 30 days
One and a half (1.5) month's rent.
ArkansasLandlord - 30 days
Tenant - 30 days
Two (2) month's rent.
CaliforniaLandlord - 30 or 60 days
Tenant - 30 days
Two (2) month's rent.
ColoradoLandlord - 21 days
Tenant - 21 days
No limit.
ConnecticutLandlord - 3 days
Tenant - None stated
Two (2) month's rent. If Older than 62 years of age - one (1) month's rent
DelawareLandlord - 60 days
Tenant - 60 days
No limit for first year of rent. One (1) month rent after the first year.
FloridaLandlord - 30 days
Tenant - 30 days
No limit.
GeorgiaLandlord - 60 days
Tenant - 30 days
No limit.
HawaiiLandlord - 45 days
Tenant - 28 days
One (1) month's rent.
Exceptions: Two (2) month's rent for pets.
IdahoLandlord - One (1) month
Tenant - One (1) month
No limit.
IllinoisLandlord - 30 days
Tenant - 30 days
No limit.
IndianaLandlord - One (1) month
Tenant - One (1) month
No limit.
IowaLandlord - 30 days
Tenant - 30 days
Two (2) month's rent.
KansasLandlord - 30 days
Tenant - 30 days
One (1) month's rent.
Exceptions: If furnished, an additional half month's rent can be added. A second half month's rent can be added for pets.
KentuckyLandlord - 30 days
Tenant - 30 days
No limit.
LouisianaLandlord - 10 days
Tenant - 10 days
No limit.
MaineLandlord - 30 days
Tenant - 30 days
Two (2) month's rent.
MarylandLandlord - One (1) month
Tenant - One (1) month
Two (2) month's rent.
MassachusettsLandlord - 30 days*
Tenant - 30 days*
(*or time between payments - whichever length of time is greater)
One (1) month's rent.
MichiganLandlord - One (1) month
Tenant - One (1) month
One (1) and a half month's rent.
MinnesotaLandlord - Three (3) months*
Tenant - Three (3) months*
(*or time between rental payments - whichever length of time is less)
No limit.
MississippiLandlord - 30 days
Tenant - 30 days
No limit.
MissouriLandlord - One (1) month
Tenant - One (1) month
Two (2) month's rent.
MontanaLandlord - 30 days
Tenant - 30 days
No limit.
NebraskaLandlord - 30 days
Tenant - 30 days
One (1) month's rent.
With pets, one quarter (1/4) month's rent can be added.
NevadaLandlord - 30 days
Tenant - 30 days
Three (3) month's rent.
New HampshireLandlord - 30 days
Tenant - 30 days
One (1) month's rent or $100 - whichever monetary amount is greater.
Exceptions: If landlord & tenant share any facilities - no limit.
New JerseyLandlord - One (1) month
Tenant - One (1) month
One and a half month's rent (1.5). Consequent annual deposits can not be greater than 10% of the current deposit.
New MexicoLandlord - 30 days
Tenant - 30 days
One (1) month's rent.
New YorkOne (1) month's rent.
North CarolinaLandlord - 7 days
Tenant - 7 days
One (1) and a half month's rent. For terms longer than two (2) months, two (2) months rent can be charged.
Exceptions: Pets can warrant additional deposit.
North DakotaLandlord - 30 days
Tenant - 30 days
One (1) month's rent.
Exceptions: Pet deposit (for non companion/service animals) can be up to $2.5k, or two (2) month's rent - whichever amount is greater. For renting to felons, can charge two (2) month's deposit.
OhioLandlord - 30 days
Tenant - 30 days
No limit.
OklahomaLandlord - 30 days
Tenant - 30 days
No limit.
OregonNo limit.
PennsylvaniaNo requirement set.Two (2) month's rent. Maximum of one (1) month's rent after first year of renting.
Rhode IslandLandlord - 30 days
Tenant - 30 days
One (1) month's rent.
South CarolinaLandlord - 30 days
Tenant - 30 days
No limit.
South DakotaLandlord - One (1) month
Tenant - One (1) month
One (1) month's rent.
Exceptions: In special circumstances, a higher security deposit may be requested.
TennesseeLandlord - 30 days
Tenant - 30 days
No limit.
TexasLandlord - One (1) month
Tenant - One (1) month
No limit.
UtahLandlord - 15 days
Tenant - No requirement
No limit.
VermontLandlord - 30 days
Tenant - 30-90 days*
(*If no agreement was signed, tenant is required to give sixty (60) days notice (if living in property for less than 2 years). If living in property for more than 2 years, required notice is ninety (90) days. If agreement was signed, 30 days for less than 2 years, and 60 days for more.)
No limit.
VirginiaLandlord - 30 days*
Tenant - 30 days*
(*the rental contract may provide a different notice requirement)
Two (2) month's rent.
WashingtonLandlord - 20 days
Tenant - 20 days
No limit.
West VirginiaLandlord - One (1) month
Tenant - One (1) month
No limit.
WisconsinLandlord - 28 days
Tenant - 28 days
No limit.
WyomingNo requirement set.No limit.

How to Write a Month-to-Month Lease

The following instructions are for completing the month-to-month lease in both Adobe PDF & Microsoft Word. For those that need to make edits to the document, the Word format should be downloaded. It is important the landlord read through the entire agreement, making any changes to language as necessary to comply with local and state laws. Hiring a licensed attorney or real estate professional is highly recommended to ensure all provisions of the agreement offer both legal protection and clearly convey the terms and conditions that the tenant is required to comply with during the course of the lease.

Step 1 – Download the Contract

At the top of the page, click either the “PDF” or “WORD” buttons that are found under the sample document image. The form will then be downloaded.

Step 2 – Date & Parties

Enter the day, month, and year that the agreement will officially go into effect. Then, the landlord will need to print their name followed by the name(s) of the tenant(s) that will be renting the property.

Step 3 – Grant of Lease

Write the full address of the rental property, including any apartment or condominium numbers.

Step 4 – Term of Lease

In this field, enter the following:

  • Lease start date
  • Landlord and tenant’s required notice (in days) for terminating the agreement

Step 5 – Security Deposit

Write the total dollar amount in both words (e.g. “One-hundred dollars”) and numbers (“$100”). Then, enter the percentage interest the tenant is entitled to receive.

Step 6 – Rent Payments

In the first field, enter both the dollar amount in words and digits for the total amount of rent that will be paid to the landlord. Due to the agreement most likely having no set number of payments, leaving this field blank is acceptable.

On the proceeding lines, enter the following information:

  • The # of days a tenant has to pay rent after receiving notice (the law section can be deleted if the landlord does not wish to cite state law)
  • If the landlord will require the tenant to pay a move-in fee, enter a dollar amount. If none, leave blank.
  • If the parties decide on an end date to the agreement (while still allowing the contract to be terminated at any date – keeping as a monthly-based contract), enter both the contract beginning and end-date, starting with the date the agreement terminates.

Step 7 -Eviction

Enter the number of days that can pass after non-payment of rent before the tenant can be evicted. Ensure state laws comply with the days listed.

Step 8 – Utilities

Check the corresponding box next to the utilities that the landlord will pay for. Any boxes left unchecked will be the tenant’s responsibility.

Step 9 – Mail Box Key

Enter the amount of money the tenant(s) will be required to pay if the issued mail key is lost, the mailbox number, and the parking space number. If no mailbox was issued or if there is no designated parking spot, leave the non-applicable fields blank or delete them altogether from the agreement.

Step 10 – Assignment / Sublet

Write the number of days notice the tenant is required to give before subletting the rental.

Step 11 – Condition of Premises

State the number of days the tenant has to provide a report any structural defects, items that need replacing, leaks, and any other damage to the property.

Step 12 – Notice of Injuries

Enter the amount of time (in days) that can pass before the tenant is required to report any injuries or damage that occurred in or near the rental.

Step 13 – Abandonment

State the number of days in a row of non-present tenant(s) that constitutes classifying the property as abandoned.

Step 14 – Absence

If the tenant will be away from the property for any length of time, use this section to specify the length of time which qualifies for requiring the tenant to give the landlord written notice of said absence.

Step 15 – Governing Law

Enter the name of the state in which the rental property is located.

Step 16 – Additional Provisions

Write additional conditions or state-mandated disclosures in the lines provided.

Step 17 – Signatures

The landlord and tenant(s) will need to write their printed names, their signatures, and the dates in which each party signed the contract. Once all signatures have been recorded on the lease, it will go into effect.